Italian wine types you should try – Part II

Last week we started our series of articles dedicated to the Italian wine types you have to try at least once in your...

Italian wine

Last week we started our series of articles dedicated to the Italian wine types you have to try at least once in your life. We hope you have appreciated our recommendations and have had a chance to open a bottle of fruity Ribolla Gialla o tender Friulano accompanied by delicious grilled fish.

This week we are going on with the Italian wine series and presenting you our favourites, this time let’s talk about red wine!

Lagrein – an Italian wine with northern roots

Source: www.albinomartinelli.com
Source: www.albinomartinelli.com

This delicious wine with an intense deep red colour comes from Lagarina valley in Trentino-Alto Adige region in the North of Italy on the Italian-Austrian boarded. The first mentions about Lagrein were made in the 17th century near Bolzano, the capital of Trentino-Alto Adige. This Italian wine is highly local and can be hardly found outside its native region.

The grapes that are used to produce Lagrein are more acid than other grape types which makes Lagrein leave a tannic taste in your mouth. The taste of this Italian wine in some way reminds of dark berry and cherry . Lagrein also has some tobacco flavour together with some mushroom notes.

Thanks to its high acidity Lagrein perfectly pairs with meat, vegetables and most cheeses.

Marzemino – the last wish of Don Giovanni

Source: www.strongmanrun.it
Source: www.strongmanrun.it

This delicate wine with floral elements comes from Rovereto region and was initially introduced by Venetians in the 16th century. The most popular location for making Marzemino is Val Lagarino – a place at the foot of the mountains where the summer is short and hot and the winter is quite mild and rainy.

Traditionally Marzemino is aged in small barrels made of oak wood. Its smell gets combined with the natural flavour of this Italian wine and makes its taste unbelievably delicate and light. The best age for Marzemino is not more than 2-3 years.

It’s interesting to know that Marzemino was mentioned in the opera Don Giovanni by Mozart. Before being delivered to hell, Don Giovanni is asked to express his death wish. Without hesitating he replies that before dying he would like to drink… a glass of Marzemino!