Vita, the Italian app in Tim Cook’s court

Cesare De Cal, an Italian 18 years old student from Milan, and his creation Vita, a app which helps children to learn mathematics easily, were...

Vita

Cesare De Cal, an Italian 18 years old student from Milan, and his creation Vita, a app which helps children to learn mathematics easily, were selected by Apple to attend the Worldwide Developer Conference, the convention organized every year by Apple in San Francisco, California, with laboratories and meetings for the best young developers from all over the world. The Milanese student is the youngest Italian talent invited at the conference.

Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., center, stands for a photograph with WWDC 2016 Scholarship program winners during the Apple World Wide Developers Conference (WWDC) in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Monday, June 13, 2016. Apple Inc.'s mobile-payment service Apple Pay will now work on websites, a long-awaited feature that will pit the company directly against companies such as PayPal Holdings Inc. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg
Source: gettyimages

Vita in the Top 100 Most Downloaded

Cesare designed “Vita” as a game for children that is able to recognize their handwriting and let them learn mathematics simply playing. The app is already available in the App Store and it was inserted in the Top 100 Most Downloaded app in 18 countries. “Apple gave me a scholarship to attend the conference and my app was judged one of the best 350 app designed by students”, proudly states Cesare.

From vacuum cleaner of paper to app development

Cesare is just 18 years old but he already has a very remarkable résumé. Before the creation of Vita, he has already developped five apps, among which the most considerable is Sugar Minder, a app which stimulate children with diabetes to monitor regularly the level of glucose in the blood. In 2015, he partecipated at Zero Robotics, an Italian robotic competition organized by Nasa and MIT, as a team leader. “I taught high-level programming concepts and collaborated with computer science professors to coordinate my group”, explains Cesare.

Cesare De Cal and Tim Cook

Cesare has always been addicted to technology. “When I was at kindergarten, I used to build vacuum cleaner made of paper. Then, I found an old computer in my grandparents’ house and I started getting computer science enthusiast. At high school a professor of mines introduced me to programming and app development”. The last success was presenting Vita to Tim Cook: “There was only the time for a selfie” – remembers Cesare – “because he is a very busy man. Nevertheless, he is always very kind with the young scholarship winners and nevers seems tired or annoyed”.